Information is not the answer

Design experiences, not information… Every learning leader has faced the dilemma of being asked to cram too much information into a training course because of a customer’s belief that “more information¬†is better learning.”¬† You know the drill, and it usually starts something like this, “Hey Jim, thanks for designing that course for us. I wasContinue reading “Information is not the answer”

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Writing effective scenario questions

Want to increase the quality of your assessment questions? Think stories!
Scenario-based evaluation questions help the learner to really think about the content, not just regurgitate facts or data. Check out this easy plan for constructing good scenario questions:

Hendrich’s ABCD Model for Constructing Effective Scenario Questions …

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Free Microsoft eLearning Development Tool

Microsoft has rolled out a FREE tool called LCDS. LCDS is an eLearning development tool that Microsoft is using to develop their multimedia driven eLearning. It can output to Flash, SilverLight, SCORM, HTML and more…

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Learning styles

Looking for some information about learning style inventories?

After years of facilitating learning styles workshops, I offer you the following perspectives/ideas:

1. The http://www.learning-styles-online.com inventory is good. The “Learning and techniques” section that they provide as feedback for the quiz results is solid, and the detailed combinations of style results are powerful.

2. Another free and useful inventory…

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Visual storytelling

We’ve heard over and again that the power of visual imagery is unbeatable in instructional design. Yet, we struggle to find and use images that accurately capture and evoke the kind of emotion that connects audiences with the story we are trying to tell. Perhaps you’ve seen the famed YouTube video series, “In Plain English,” where the CommonCraft geniuses show us (rather than tell us) the essence of Web 2.0 technologies. It is this kind of visual storytelling that captures our attention and ignites our imagination.

So, how can you show, rather than tell, your story?

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