Fancytalk


Check out these excellent writing tips from IBM on how to “Globalize your On Demand Business” 

Style tips

The following style suggestions can help ensure your information is clear for all types of audiences:

  • Write sentences as short and simple as possible. Try to keep sentences to 25 words or less.
  • Make sure that lists are complete and can stand by themselves.
  • Use a complete sentence to introduce a list.
  • Make list items complete sentences or complete phrases.
  • Make list items parallel in structure.
  • Avoid slang, jargon, humor, sarcasm, colloquialisms, and metaphors. For example, use “estimate” instead of “in the ballpark.”
  • Be succinct. Eliminate unnecessary text and redundancies.
  • Do not use Latin abbreviations.
  • Avoid negative constructions. For example, use “It is like the previous request” rather than “It is not unlike the previous request.” Or, use “Log on again to reconnect” instead of “You cannot reconnect without logging on again.”
  • Avoid ambiguity.
  • Use an appropriate and consistent tone.
  • Choose examples that are appropriate for the intended audience.

Grammar tips

  • Appropriate grammar enables easier, more accurate translations and enhances audience understanding:
  • Write in active voice whenever possible and use the present tense.
  • Avoid the infinitive (to create), present participle (creating), and past participle (created) forms of verbs in the beginning of sentences. These verbs are less direct, and the subject of the clause is not always obvious. Completing steps could mean “When you complete the steps” or “Because you complete the steps.”
  • Avoid noun strings. Limit compound phrases to no more than three words. When a compound phrase is used, be sure that it has only one meaning and that the phrase is used consistently.
  • Make the subject of a verb phrase clear. Avoid complex sentences where several adverbs or other modifiers are used. If you use complex sentences, it is particularly important to include whatever words are necessary to make the subject clear. Do not omit the word “that” from clauses. The use of the conjunction “that,” while technically optional in some sentences, is never wrong and makes the sentence easier to translate and clearer for users whose primary language is not English. For example, use “Verify that your directory service is working” rather than “Verify your directory service is working.”
  • Avoid using words in multiple grammatical categories (verb, noun, adjective). In English, many words can change their grammatical category. In most other languages, the same word cannot be a verb, a noun, and an adjective. (Use “during the restore operation” instead of “during the restore.”)
  • Avoid ambiguous pronoun references where the pronoun can possibly refer to more than one antecedent. For example, in the statement “If there is prompt text for the completed field, it does not change,” it is not clear if the “prompt text” does not change or the “completed field” does not change.
  • Use simple and clear coordination so the reader can tell what the relationships are between the elements of a sentence. For example, “the file or result field definition” could mean: “The result-field definition or the file,” “The file definition or the result-field definition,” “The file-field definition or the result-field definition,” “The definition of the file or of the result field,” or “The field definition of the file or of the result.”
  • Ensure the elements of a sentence are parallel. Words, phrases, and clauses should be grammatically equal. Use “network management, databases, and application programs” rather than “network management, databases, and writing application programs.”
  • Avoid using too many prepositions in a sentence, but do not omit prepositions or articles that are necessary. The sentence “This is a list of the current status of all event monitors for this process” could be rewritten to “This lists the current status of all event monitors for this process.”
  • Do not use the dash parenthetically (as in “It is at this point – the start point – that designers and writers meet”). Translators, however, accept the dash being used to show an extension of a sentence (as in “The most important people in IBM are the customers – they pay us”).

English

Spanish

Hi! ¡Hola!
Good Morning! ¡Buenos Días!
Good Evening! ¡Buenas Tardes!
Welcome! (to greet someone) ¡Bienvenido!
How Are You? ¿Cómo Estás?
I’m Fine, Thanks! Estoy Bíen ¡Gracias!
And You? ¿Y Tú?
Good/ So-So. Bíen/ Más o menos
Thank You (Very Much)! ¡(Muchas) Gracias!
You’re Welcome! (answering “thank you”) ¡De Nada!
Hey! Friend! ¡Eh! ¡Amigo!
I Missed You So Much! ¡Te Extraño Mucho!
What’s New? ¿Qué Hay De Nuevo?
Nothing Much Nada
Good Night! ¡Buenas noches!
See You Later! ¡Hasta luego!
Good Bye! ¡Adiós!

 

Japanese

The Japanese translation of each English phrase or expression is written in two or three ways: 1) romaji, 2) hiragana (and/or katakana), and 3) kanji, if applicable.

English Japanese Translation in:Romaji,
Hiragana (and/or Katakana),
Kanji, if applicable.
Hello. Konnichiwa.
こんにちは。
Good morning. Ohayou.
おはよう。
Good afternoon. Konnichiwa.
こんにちは。
Good evening. Konbanwa.
こんばんわ。
Good night. Oyasuminasai.
おやすみなさい。
Good bye. Sayounara.
さようなら。
See you later. Matane.
またね。
Take care. Kiwotsukete.
きをつけて。
気をつけて。
How are you? Choushiwadou?
ちょうしはどう?
調子はどう?
I’m fine. Genkidesu.
げんきです。
元気です。
Thank you. Arigatou.
ありがとうB
有り難う。
What’s your name? Onamaewa?
おなまえは?
お名前は?
My name is Elvis. Watashino namaewa Elvis desu.
わたしのなまえはエルビスです。
私の名前はエルビスです。
Nice to meet you. Oaidekite ureshiidesu.
おあいできてうれしいです。
お会いできて嬉しいです。
Thank you for your help. Osewani narimashita.
おせわになりました。
お世話になりました。
You are welcome. Douitashimashite.
どういたしまして。
I really appreciate it. Hontouni kansha shiteimasu.
ほんとうにかんしゃします。
本当に感謝しています。
Yes. Hai.
はい。
No. Iie
いいえ。
That’s right. Sonotouridesu.
そのとおりです。
その通りです。
I understand. Wakarimashita.
わかりました。
I can’t speak Japanese
very well.
Watashiwa nihongowo amari umaku
hanasemasen.
わたしはにほんごをあまりうまくはなせません。
私は日本語をあまり上手く話せません。
I don’t know. Shirimasen.
しりません。
知りません。
No, thank you. Iie, kekkoudesu.
いいえ、けっこうです。
いいえ、結構です。
I’m sorry. Gomennasai.
ごめんなさい。
I’m sorry I’m late. Okurete sumimasen.
おくれてすみません。
遅れてすみません。
Excuse me. Sumimasen.
すみません。
May I help you? Goyoudeshouka?
ごようでしょうか?
ご用でしょうか?
Please say it again. Mouichido ittekudasai.
もういちどいってください。
もう一度言って下さい。
Really? Honto?
ほんと?
 Pardon? E?
え?
Tea, please. Ocha wo kudasai.
おちゃをください。
お茶を下さい。
Check, please. Okanjyou wo onegaishimasu.
おかんじょうをおねがいします。
お勘定をお願いします。
Please speak more slowly. Mousukoshi yukkuri hanashite kudasai.
もうすこしゆっくりはなしてください。
もう少しゆっくり話して下さい。
Do you unnderstand me? Watashino iukotoga wakarimasuka?
わたしのいうことがわかりますか?
私の言う事が分かりますか?
Please write it down here. Kokoni kaite kudasai.
ここにかいてください。
ここに書いて下さい。
Can I have this? Korewo moraemasuka?
これをもらえますか?
I want this one. Korega hoshiinodesuga.
これがほしいのですが。
これが欲しいのですが。
Call me. denwa shitene.
でんわしてね。
電話してね。
I’ll call you. Denwa surune.
でんわするね。
電話するね。
Call me Elvis. Elvis to yondekure.
エルビスとよんでくれ。
エルビスと呼んでくれ。
Call me Nicole. Nicole to yondene.
ニコールとよんでね。
ニコールと呼んでね。
Excellent! Subarashii!
すばらしい!
素晴らしい!
I can’t believe it!
/ Unbelievable!
Shinjirarenai!
しんじられない!
信じられない!
I can’t stand it any longer! Mougamandekinai!
もうがまんできない!
もう我慢できない!
That’s enough. Mouiiyo
もういいよ。
How could you? Nantoiukotowo!
なんということを!
何ということを!
I’m counting on you. Tanomuyo.
たのむよ。
頼むよ。
May I sit here? Kokoni suwattemo ii desuka?
ここにすわってもいいですか?
ここに座ってもいいですか?
May I ask something? Chotto okiki shitai no desuga.
ちょっとおききしたいのですが。
ちょっとお聞きしたいのですが。
Do you have a pen? Pen wo omochi desuka?
ペンをおもちですか?
ペンをお持ちですか?
Are there any rooms
available?
Heya wa arimasuka?
へやはありますか?
部屋はありますか?
How much is it? Ikura desuka?
いくらですか?
How much does it cost? Ikura kakarimasuka?
いくらかかりますか?
How old are you? Nansai desuka?
なんさいですか?
何歳ですか?
How far is it to get to ~? ~ made dorekurai arimasuka?
~までどれくらいありますか?
*Replace ~ with the name of a place.
Kiss me. Kiss shite.
キスして
I want to hold you. Dakishimetai.
だきしめたい。
抱きしめたい。
Would you like to go on
a date?
Date shimasen ka?
デートしませんか?
You are the most beautiful
woman I’ve ever seen.
Kimi wa bokuga imamade mitanakade
mottomo utsukushii josei da.きみは ぼくが いままで みたなかで 
もっとも うつくしい じょせいだ。君は、僕が今まで見た中で
最も美しい女性だ。
I want this! Kore hoshii!
これほしい!
これ欲しい!
You liar! Usotsuki!
うそつき!
嘘つき!
You have beautiful eyes. Kirei na me shiteru ne.
きれいな め してるね。
綺麗な目してるね。
You have a nice figure. Sutairu ii ne.
スタイルいいね。

Health Problems.


I have a sore throat. Nodo ga itai.
のどがいたい。
喉が痛い。
I have a stomachache. I ga itai.
いがいたい。
胃が痛い。
I have a fever. Netsu ga arimasu.
ねつがあります。
熱があります。
I need a medicine. Kusuri ga hituyou desu.
くすりがひつようです。
薬が必要です。
I feel sick. Kibun ga warui.
きぶんがわるい。
気分が悪い。
I feel nauseated. Hakike ga simasu.
はきけがします。
吐き気がします。
I have diarrhea. Geri wo siteimasu.
げりをしています。
下痢をしています。
I can’t sleep. Nemuremasen.
ねむれません。
眠れません。
What should I eat? Nani wo tabereba iino-desuka?
なにをたべればいいのですか?
何を食べればいいのですか?
May I have medicine? Kusuri wo kudasai.
くすりをください。
薬を下さい。
May I have a receit? Receit wo kudasai.
レシートをください。
レシートを下さい。
a doctor isha
いしゃ
医者
hospital byo(u)in, or byoh-in
びょういん
病院

Some pronunciation tips for Swedish phrases:

Most consonants are exactly the same in Swedish as they are in English. Some exceptions:

j: pronounced like the “y” in “yellow”
g: pronounced like the American “g” if it is followed by an a, o, or å; pronounced like the “y” in “yellow” if followed by an e, i, ä, or ö
k: pronounced like the American “k” if it is followed by an a, o, or å; pronounced like “sh” if followed by an e, i, ä, or ö
rs: r followed by s is pronounced as “sh”

This provides a basic idea of the pronunciation of vowels:

a: pronounced like the “aw” in “claw”
e: pronounced like the “e” in “fell”
i: pronounced like the “ee” in “fleece”
o: the pronunciation falls between that of “o” in “close” and “oo” in “moose”
u: pronounced like the “oo” in “moose”
y: the pronunciation falls between that of “oo” in “moose” and “y” in “any” (the trick: shape your mouth as if you were going to say “y” but then try to say “oo”)
å: the pronunciation falls between that of “o” in “close” and “o” in “pot”
ä: pronounced like the “a” in “apple”
ö: pronounced like the “u” in “full”

Responses

  1. Hi Susan,

    What a lovely website!

    ~Lisset

    Like

  2. Thank you, Susan for this simple listing for learning.

    Hontouni kansha shiteimasu!

    Takashi Maketo

    Like

  3. サーフィン 通販

    Like


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