Posted by: Susan Hendrich | February 19, 2016

Micro-moments: Putting content at key decision points

So many “micro-moments” in a day…comeinwereawesomesign

I want-to-know moments, I want-to-go moments, I want-to-do moments, and I want-to-buy moments.

These are the decision moments that consumers encounter throughout the day when they experience a want or perceive a need for themselves.

Think with Google writer Sridhar Ramaswamy says,

Today’s battle for hearts, minds, and dollars is won (or lost) in micro-moments—intent-driven moments of decision-making and preference-shaping that occur throughout the entire consumer journey.

For example, you check into your hotel in an unfamiliar town, and you’re hungry. You don’t know what’s available, but you’re looking out the window and you notice a “restaurant open” sign. You wonder what they serve, and if it’s any good. Suddenly, you turn your head and notice that there’s a brochure on your hotel nightstand with that restaurant’s menu, which proudly mentions of its five-star rating on TripAdvisor. You’re a consumer. You’re hungry. And this is a decision moment. Guess what you’re doing for dinner!

These micro-moments can be game changers in the capability-building world, too.

Think about it. Learners are consumers, too. And learners have countless decision moments…I-want-to-understand moments, I-want-to-know-how moments, that drive their choice to engage, or not, with your content.  How can you design and deliver your content so that it’s available at the point of need—the precious micro-moments when your learners are ready and looking?

Read more about micro-moments in the Wall Street Journal and stay up-to-date on the latest insights and research at thinkwithgoogle.com/micromoments.

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YOUR TURN!

Please share comments with your ideas for saving time and energy.

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About Dr. Hendrich

During two decades of leading teams toward extraordinary results in health care, pharmaceutical, arts & cultural, university and military organizations, Susan Hendrich has always been inspired by the stories of people achieving uncommon results through perseverence, positivity and prying opportunity from challenge. Susan’s mantra is “ganbatte kudasai,  which means, “Always try your best.”

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